POSTED: November 8th 2012
ViewPoint

TIM LEFFEL: Top-5 Luxury Hotels in Tokyo, Japan

The Park Hyatt was the scene of the movie Lost in Translation / Park Hyatt
The Park Hyatt was the scene of the movie Lost in Translation / Park Hyatt

Tim Leffel has written travel books, business books, articles for travel publications and has a blog Perceptive Travel / Tim Leffel image
Tim Leffel has written travel books, business books, articles for travel publications and has a blog Perceptive Travel / Tim Leffel image

TIM LEFFEL / Sports Features Communications  

November 8 - Frequent travelers to Tokyo can argue for an hour about which luxury hotels in the city are “the best.” There’s no clear winner like there is in many major cities and this is one of those rare spots where just being a Four Seasons doesn’t get you to the top.

In Tokyo’s best hotels, expect fawning service, strong attention to detail, and a price tag that will tell you you’re definitely not sleeping in a the other iconic type from here: the capsule hotel.  

Imperial Hotel Tokyo

In the world’s most populated city, luxury is often defined by space. Since it was established in 1890, the Imperial has an enviable amount of that and it’s also got the pedigree of hosting kings and heads of state for more than 120 years. An elegant, prestigious address with room to spread out.

http://www.imperialhotel.co.jp/e/tokyo  

Shangri-La Hotel Tokyo

One of the newest hotels in the city, this outpost of a respected Asian luxury chain is near the Imperial Palace and adjacent to Tokyo Station in the heart of the city, where you catch a bullet train to the north and south.  With more than 2,000 works of art and chandeliers in the elevators, this hotel exudes moneyed style.

http://www.shangri-la.com/tokyo/shangrila

Mandarin Oriental

In the prime business district of Nihonbashi and near the Imperial Palace, this high-rise has spectacular city views at night and gets rave reviews for its 36th-floor spa, its martini bar, and restaurants: two Michelin-starred, one serving molecular gastronomy tapas.

http://www.mandarinoriental.com/tokyo/  

Park Hyatt

This favorite with Americans became even more well-known after appearing in the movie Lost in Translation.  Occupying the top 14 floors of a 52-story skyscraper, some of the most spacious rooms in town offer  views all the way to Mt. Fuji and the bustling Shinjuku shopping and entertainment area is nearby.

http://tokyo.park.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels-tokyo-park/  

Hotel Seiyo Ginza

This 77-room hotel that’s part of the Rosewood group offers a more boutique experience and personal service. In a great location in the hopping Ginza district, it also has spacious bathrooms with separate showers—real luxury in what is probably the world’s priciest real estate market. 

http://www.seiyo-ginza.com/  

In such a populated and spread-out city, it’s helpful to consult a map and figure out the best spot for what you will be doing in Tokyo. Plus if you’ve got a big stash of loyalty points from your favorite hotel chain, this can be a good place to cash them in. While these five hotels featured here may be ranked the highest, the worthy contenders include Four Seasons (two locations), Ritz-Carlton, Conrad, Grand Hyatt, Peninsula, Intercontinental, and Nikkko.

2020 Games

Tokyo is bidding against Istanbul and Madrid to host the 2020 summer Olympics. The final host city will be voted in 2013 at the IOC session in Buenos Aires.


Tim Leffel is the author of four travel books and editor of the award-winning webzine Perceptive Travel. http://www.perceptivetravel.com


Keywords · Tokyo 2020 · luxury hotels · Tim Leffel · Park Hyatt · Imperial Hotel · Shangri La · Mandarin Oriental · Hotel Seiyo Ginza


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